Readiness of kindergarten teachers along k 12 curriculum essay

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Readiness of kindergarten teachers along k 12 curriculum essay

Teachers could list multiple methods of training Theme 6: Of the 16 parent participants, 11 expressed concern about the upcoming kindergarten experience and whether their children would be ready for the expectations regarding behavior and academic performance that they believed to be part of kindergarten.

Of the 11 parents who expressed anxiety, all focused on the new tasks and expectations that children would encounter in kindergarten, particularly in regard to reading and literacy skills. In addition, concerns about social maturity emerged among parents.

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Parent 13 Parents and teachers expressed concern about kindergarten expectations for mastery of reading, and at the same time, described the extensive focus on literacy skills in their respective preschool programs.

Teachers described the importance of reassuring parents that children were adequately prepared. However, none of the 13 teachers expressed concern about the developmental appropriateness of their programs or the breadth and depth of experiences they provided to children.

Within-Program Comparisons Beliefs among parents and teachers were generally consistent within each program. In each program, teachers and parents described social and emotional skills as being essential to readiness.

Teachers and parents generally agreed that literacy skills and school-related routines were important elements in readiness.

Readiness of Kindergarten Teachers along K Curriculum | Essay Example

Parents and teachers had similar positive perceptions of preschools, and shared some anxieties about kindergarten expectations. Teachers and parents also agreed that communication about developmental progress, as related to readiness, was an important part of their programs.

Differences within programs among parents and teachers also emerged. While teachers in Program A expressed beliefs that parents expected more literacy skills from their program and were less concerned with social and emotional readiness, parental interviews did not confirm this.

Parents in Program B associated literacy skills with readiness, while teachers more often emphasized social and emotional factors. Teachers and parents in Program B were united in describing the practice of holding back as a way to help a child whom they feel may not be ready for kindergarten, while no teachers in Programs A or C did so.

Two parents in Program B discussed the relative youth of their children compared with other kindergartners. Because parents in Program B reported the highest income and highest educational levels of the three groups see Table 2this finding is consistent with research by Diamond, Reagan, and Bandyk and Hatcher and Engelbrechtwho reported that highly educated parents are more anxious about school success and more likely to delay kindergarten entry for their children.

Most parents and teachers agreed that they maintained close communication about readiness issues. In Program C, both parents and teachers emphasized attainment of literacy skills as the predominant goal of readiness. All five teachers described in detail the work they did helping children to gain basic self-help skills.

In contrast, parents discussed literacy and math skills attained in preschool with minimal discussion of self-help skills. Parents described their responsibility in preparing their children for kindergarten, although teachers did not mention this aspect.

This is in contrast to research by Diamond et al. Across-program comparisons Programs A and B were both university lab schools but were located in different cultural contexts rural vs. Responses from participants from Programs A and B suggested that they perceived developmentally appropriate practice and play in preschool to be important to kindergarten readiness, while participants from Program C, a multisite Head Start program, emphasized specific literacy skills and school behaviors.

While all groups noted the importance of literacy, parents in Program B and C discussed literacy extensively, particularly citing the need for children to gain early reading skills before kindergarten. We speculate that this is likely influenced by highly publicized national-level conversations about early education.

In its report, Transforming Public Educationthe Pew Foundation set out an ambitious and comprehensive plan to include prekindergarten as part of an overall continuum of learning through grade The National Institute for Early Education Research provides annual summaries of initiatives to establish publicly funded preschools across the United States.

Participants in all programs shared a multidimensional definition of kindergarten readiness, citing social and emotional factors as the core of readiness, combined with perceived academic components such as literacy skills. This finding has implications for both preschools and kindergarten.

It confirms and justifies the priority given to social skills in many preschool programs. Because social interaction opportunities for young children often occur in the context of play, the role of play, in particular center-based and free-play experiences in preschools, remains essential to meeting the social readiness goals most parents and teachers express for preschoolers.

Maintaining direct links between social skills, play, and future school success in the minds of parents and the practices of teachers will assist preschools that may be experiencing pressure to align curriculum with K—3 programming and to include more direct instruction of specific academic-based skills.

Two of the three programs in this study, Programs A and B, are accredited by the NAEYC, which advocates developmentally appropriate, play-based experiences.

Yet, even in these programs, when asked about kindergarten readiness, teachers initially cited literacy skills and cooperation with school routines. While a few parents cited play as important to preschool experiences, a direct association of play with school readiness was not mentioned in the interviews.

Most participants linked prereading skills and kindergarten readiness.

Research K to 12 chapters 1 to 5 READINESS | Emy Lacorte - leslutinsduphoenix.com

Intense attention has been paid to early literacy and language acquisition in preschool McClelland et al. In all three programs, teachers, and parents alike expressed the belief that children should have multiple opportunities for building literacy skills in preschool.

Contextual factors may have influenced different responses across programs. In addition, no private schools or bridge programs were available in the area. Program C is a Head Start program designed to serve low-income families whose resources may be too limited to provide children with an extra year of schooling before enrollment in public school.More Kindergarten Teachers Guides will be uploaded soon.

You can always visit this page to check for newly uploaded files. Thank you. More Kindergarten Teachers Guides will be uploaded soon. Kindergarten Teachers Guide | K to 12 Curriculum. We will write a custom essay sample on “The K to 12” Program specifically for you To attain this salient features of the K to 12 Curriculum, all Grade Three teachers in the Philippines under went to a series of lectures where in it tackled everything about the curriculum for it to be more effective and enjoyable not just to the learners.

Eleven teachers and 12 parents described literacy skills (both general and specific) as essential to kindergarten readiness. the minds of parents and the practices of teachers will assist preschools that may be experiencing pressure to align curriculum with K–3 programming and to include more direct instruction of specific academic-based.

Readiness of Kindergarten Teachers along K Curriculum Essay Sample January 3, November 9, admin One of the major reforms in our country’s educational system is Republic Act otherwise known as “The Kindergarten Education Law” or the K to12 (K+12).

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Thesis about k to 12 curriculum in the Philippines Essay Sample. parents and teachers regarding the implementation of K – 12 program which is being implemented under President Aquino administration. K – Letter “K” refers to kindergarten and “12” refers to the additional two (2) years in the basic education.

It is the. Readiness of Kindergarten Teachers along K competencies BACKGROUND OF THE STUDY One of the major reforms in our country’s educational system is Republic Act , otherwise known as “The Kindergarten Education Law” or the K to12 (K+12).

Readiness of kindergarten teachers along k 12 curriculum essay
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